Feeds:
Posts
Comments

The new fieldhouse is nearing completion, though commemorative features have yet to be installed. As evident by the retaining wall that supports the slope the Akebono grows from, a significant amount of landscaping has been done. The official opening is expected to be in the spring during the Cherry Blossom Festival. An unofficial opening was held this past Saturday, February 6 when the Oppenheimer Park drummers performed and people were able to look inside the building.

Construction of Oppenheimer Park began in early June 2009 and is expected to reopen in January 2010. Initially, the Park was to be kept open and redeveloped in two phases with one half closed at a time; however, the City has decided to forgo the two step process and complete the redevelopment in one year to reduce costs, to minimize safety concerns and to ensure locals have access to the Park during the 2010 Olympics. The work planned for the Park is extensive: besides the new Fieldhouse, there will also be a new drainage system placed in the soil, new grass, new pathways, new children’s play area and even new sidewalks in some places with concrete benches. Currently, the entire Park is fenced off and inaccessible.

During the spring of this year, the Coalition took part in several meetings with City officials, local residents, artists, community members and other stakeholders to discuss commemorative features for the Park. Through a design charrette, the Legacy Sakura, First Nations presence, the Asahi baseball team and the labour movement were identified as key elements of the Park that would be highlighted through commemoration. The process was particularly time sensitive as any potential commemoration connected to the Fieldhouse needed to be included in the information for tender.

The Coalition is pleased announce that through community discussions, it was finally agreed in April that the Legacy Sakura commemoration would become permanently integrated into the new Fieldhouse. Features will include a silhouette of the Akebono tree that was transplanted back in February surrounded by falling sakura petals fritted (a process whereby an image is fired onto the surface of the glass creating a permanent, translucent image) onto the east facing windows of the new building. An old poem was scribed on a plaque that was once attached to the large rock which still sits in the Park but was long ago stolen will also accompany the Akebono image and will be fritted onto the glass. This memorial to the trees and our issei pioneers on the Fieldhouse is fitting, not only as a central and constant reminder of the story of the Issei, but also to the two kwanzan trees that were lost in the fall of 2008 to accommodate the location of the new Fieldhouse.

Additional commemoration features for the First Nations, historic Asahi baseball team and the labour movement are not planned to commence until later in the year or as the Park construction nears completion. The entrance to the Fieldhouse will have a First Nations presence with the image of “Welcoming Hands” ushering visitors to the building while the Asahi will be acknowledged at the former location of the baseball diamond. There are still several more discussions to come as other commemoration work is finalized.

As of mid August 2009, the City reported that the drainage pipes had been laid into the soil and the foundation for the Fieldhouse was poured on August 14. Seeding of the new grass field is scheduled for September 15. Pathways and other building work will follow thereafter.

Nikkei Memorial Cherry Trees and Rock in OppenheimerPark
In 1977, to commemorate the Japanese Canadians’ centennial in Canada, the Japanese Canadian Seniors planted 21 Sakura on the “Powell Ground” in OppenheimerPark. This Powell Street area (old Japantown), also known as ‘Little Tokyo, was the centre of the once-thriving Japanese Canadian Community. Today, some returnees – e.g. VancouverBuddhistChurch, Vancouver Japanese Language School & Japanese Hall and some area residents – continue to be active in the community
Tonari-Gumi (Japanese Community Volunteers Association) was born in the area in 1974 and has worked since with Nikkei pioneer seniors. Tonari-Gumi was heavily involved in coordinating their centennial celebration programs and events in 1977. One event was the Powell Street Festival. Another project, fully supported by the Park Board and involving Issei pioneers, was the planting of memorial cherry trees on the Powell Ground and in StanleyPark. The Tonari-Gumi seniors planted 24 memorial cherry trees altogether. These varieties of trees were chosen because of their strong role in Japanese culture. They were imported from Japan and purchased with proceeds from the Centennial lottery sales and individual donations collected within the Japanese community.
On April 16, 1977, the Japanese Canadian Centennial Tree-planting ceremony was held in conjunction with the inaugural ceremony of the much-upgraded OppenheimerPark. Over 70 Nikkei seniors participated and planted 8 cherry trees in the easterly part of the park, in addition to the 13 others planted earlier by the Park Board employees on their behalf. The Park Board extended their help in relocating a huge rock that Nikkei pioneers placed as the Memorial Rock in the landscape. They installed a plaque on the face of the rock with the Tonari-Gumi logo and Japanese poetry engraved on it. The project concluded with three additional cherry trees planted at the site of the Japanese Canadian Cenotaph in StanleyPark by two surviving veterans of World War 1, Mr. Kiyoji Iizuka and Mr. Ryoichi Kobayashi.
Currently about a dozen of these memorial cherry trees survive on the Powell Ground and two near the Cenotaph in StanleyPark. Every spring, their blossoms bring back memories of Japan and the spirit of Japanese Canadian pioneer immigrants.
The Nikkei community is working to have this OppenheimerPark area designated an official heritage site.
— Written by Mr. T. Yamashiro and submitted by Yuko Shibata, Chair of Tonari Gumi

http://www.vcbf.ca/memories

e-Nikka より

バンクーバー
遺産さくらを祝う式典

1900年代前半に日本人街として栄えたバンクーバー市のパウエル街。現在は日本人街としての面影は消え、治安も悪くなってしまった街並みであるが、その 一角にあるオッペンハイマーパークでは、今でも春には美しいさくらの花が咲き、夏には日系人最大の祭「パウエル祭」が開かれている。

1977年4月、日系移民百年祭の祝賀行事の一環として、日系カナダ人一世がオッペンハイマーパークに21本の桜の苗木を植樹した。これはカナダ社会での 日本人の歴史を象徴するものでもあり、未来の世代が潤いのある生活を送れるようにとの願いを込めて植えられたものであった。

し かし31年が経過した2008年初頭に、バンクーバー市当局の公園の再開発計画が出され、3本のさくらの伐採が必要だと発表された。このことは同公園のさ くらが持つ歴史的、文化的価値観を大切にしてきた日系人にとっては一大事であり、日系コミュニティー団体などにより「遺産さくら連合」が結成され、市当局 担当者とさくらを保存するための話し合いが続いた。

その結果、2本の関山桜(かんざんさくら)は伐採されたが、 今年2月12日、立派に成長した曙桜(あけぼのさくら)は公園内のほかの場所に植え換えられることとなった。そして4月18日には移植された曙桜を祝っ て、美しく咲き誇ったさくらの木の下で関係者による式典が行われた。

当初、遺産さくら連合と市当局の考え方は相反していた。最初移植を予定していた関山桜が予告なしに伐採され、関係者に強い失望感を与えるという出来事もあった。だから、この日を迎えた人々にとっては感無量のひとときとなった。

式 典では関係者のスピーチや功労者へのプレゼント贈呈、そして琴や太鼓などの演奏が行われ、参加者全員に花見弁当も配られた。また、市がこの公園に先住民を はじめ日系の歴史の記念碑を建てることも約束した。再生計画プロセスに日系人も公式に参加することになる。このイベントは3月28日から行われている「バ ンクーバーさくら祭」のプログラムの一環でもある。
(妹尾 翠)

http://www.e-nikka.ca/Contents/localnews.php?id=20090422150314よりい

Japantown Multicultural Neighbourhood Celebration & Cherry Blossom Festival

ジャパンタウン多文化近隣祝賀会

The story of the Legacy Sakura will be featured in two upcoming events.
遺産桜の伝説もこのイベントにて紹介されます。

“Sakura Sakura” will be shown as part of the Japantown Multicultural Neighbourhood Celebration, a full day of free cultural performances on Saturday, March 28 at various locations around the Japantown area. The film will be shown at 12pm at Chapel Arts (304 Dunlevy) with Coalition members present to discuss the film, commemoration and the Legacy Sakura Celebration in the upcoming Cherry Blossom Festival.  For programme details, click on the link below.

3月28日、正午(12時)に、 多文化地域の祝賀会 のプログラムの一環として、旧日本人街近辺チャペルアーツ(308 Dunleby)にて、短編ドキュメンタリー「さくら さくら」が上演されます。遺産桜を守る連合会のメンバーの解説、桜祭りによる遺産桜の記念碑計画の発表も同時に行われます。詳細は以下のリンクにあります。

http://www.vjls-jh.com/en/ex/jmcn_programme_e-version.pdf

On Saturday, April 18, the Legacy Sakura will be honoured during a day of activities at the Cherry Blossom Festival ranging from musical and cultural performances to an ohanami lunch. This day will cap a week’s worth of events at Oppenheimer Park as part of the Festival.  The day will also debut Linda Ohama’s eagerly anticipated film “Haru wa Akebono” that documents the relocation of the Akebono that took place on February 12.  The Legacy Sakura Celebration is in collaboration with Oppenheimer Park staff and the Vancouver Cherry Blossom Festival.  Visit http://www.vcbf.ca/ for more information on the Festival.

4月18日、土曜日には地元アーティストによる音楽演奏、発表等が遺産桜の下、お昼時に催されます。2月12日にアケボノの移植の様子の撮影を元にしたリンダ オハマ監督による「春はアケボノ」の初演も予定されております。この ジャパンタウン多文化近隣祝賀会 は、バンクーバー桜祭り委員会、オッペンハイマー公園のスタッフ、我々が共に企画してきたものです。詳細は、 http://www.vcbf.ca/  まで。

The story of the Legacy Sakura will be featured in two upcoming events.

“Sakura Sakura” will be shown as part of the Japantown Multicultural Neighbourhood Celebration, a full day of free cultural performances on Saturday, March 28 at various locations around the Japantown area. The film will be shown at 12pm at Chapel Arts (304 Dunlevy) with Coalition members present to discuss the film, commemoration and the Legacy Sakura Celebration in the upcoming Cherry Blossom Festival.  For programme details, click on the link below.

http://www.vjls-jh.com/en/ex/jmcn_programme_e-version.pdf

On Saturday, April 18, the Legacy Sakura will be honoured during a day of activities at the Cherry Blossom Festival ranging from musical and cultural performances to an ohanami lunch. This day will cap a week’s worth of events at Oppenheimer Park as part of the Festival.  The day will also debut Linda Ohama’s eagerly anticipated film “Haru wa Akebono” that documents the relocation of the Akebono that took place on February 12.  The Legacy Sakura Celebration is in collaboration with Oppenheimer Park staff and the Vancouver Cherry Blossom Festival.  Visit http://www.vcbf.ca/ for more information on the Festival.

バンクーバー市オッペンハイマー公園に残された桜  再度よみがえった一世の精神 レガシー桜連合会 バンクーバー発-一世シニアたちによってサクラがこの公園に植樹されてから、およそ三二年が経過した。今、立派に成長した曙サクラは再造営計画のために 同公園内の現在地のほど近くに植えかえられた。  曙サクラは、一九七七年の日系百年祭を祝い、未来の世代が潤いのある生活を送れるようにとの願いを込めて植樹された。  二〇〇八年の初頭、バンクーバー市当局は公園の再造営計画を承認したが、それにはサクラ数本の除去が含まれていた。これに対して、四月、オッペンハイ マー公園レガシー桜連合が日系コミュニティ団体、個人によって結成された。以来、当局担当者と話し合い、桜を守り、この桜の歴史を尊重し一般に知っても らうために、多くの努力が払われた。その結果、二本の関山桜は市当局によって二〇〇八年秋に伐採されたが、残りの桜はそのまま保存されることになった。  去る二月一二日、その桜の木が移しかえられた後、レガシー桜連合が集まり、晴れわたった寒天の下、短いが感傷を伴う式が行われた。バンクーバー仏教会 のタツヤ・アオキ開教使が読経し、その後、参加者全員はぽっかり穴をあけている新しい場所に折り紙をささげ、順番に土を穴の中に注いで儀式を終えた。  五、六〇名ほどの出席者の中に、最初の植樹式にも出席していた九三歳になる井上徳子さんがいた。彼女は一世精神の強さを体現するような人で、桜が移し かえられている三時間の間、座ることを拒んでずっと立ち続けていたのである。  井上さんの言葉は、短いがとても奥深いものがあった。全員が注視する中で、レガシー桜と一世を覚えていてくれたことに感謝した。  閉会の前に、地元のネイティブのドラマー・グループが、この木と式に捧げる歌を披露した。そのグループのリーダーは、ネイティブと日系カナダ人の両者 はともに住んでいた場所から排除された経験を持ち、強い結びつきを感じている、祖先の貢献とその歴史に敬意を表する大切さにも同感すると述べた。  同連合の会員で映像作家のリンダ・オハマが当日の式を撮影した。昨年は、レガシー桜とそれを植えた一世たちにささげる作品も制作した。リンダがしてく れたように、私たちは一世とそのレガシー桜がこれからも語り継がれるように努力してゆきたい。これまで、市当局と同公園の桜の近くに恒久的な記念碑を建 てることを検討してきた。それにはこの地域全体の記念と同時に、他の民族系の人たちとそのコミュニティについても盛り込まれるものとなるだろう。  レガシー桜に関しては、三月二八日にオッペンハイマー公園で開催されるジャパンタウン多文化近隣祝賀会でも語られることになっている。同連合はオッペ ンハイマー公園の担当者、並びに桜祭りの実行委員とも密接な打ち合わせをしてゆく予定。  当初、レガシー桜連合と市当局担当者の考え方は相反していた。だが、何度も話し合う中で、両者はレガシー桜を祝い、近隣の人たちを集めて開催する一週 間の桜祭りを、そのフィナーレのある最終日、四月一八日まで成功させるために一緒に働くに至った。 詳細は、左のサイトへどうぞ。 http://www.legacysakura.wordpress.com *この記事はデリック・イワナカ、ジョージ・クマガイ、ジュディ・ハナザワの共同執筆による。翻訳:田中ユウスケ

遺産桜のアケボノが公園南東部へ移植〜オッペンハイマー公園が今、変わろうとしている〜 ようやく所定の位置に降ろされた『アケボノ』  去る2月12日、バンクーバー市内のオッペンハイマー公園で遺産桜のうちの1本『アケボノ』が公園南東部へ移植された。これによりバンクーバー市イーストサイド活性化計画にともなう公園再開発計画が事実上、一歩踏み出したことになる。 伐採の危機がもたらした問題認識  1977年4月16日、日系移民百年祭の祝賀行事のひとつとして、日系カナダ人一世70人がオッペンハイマー公園に21本の桜の苗木を植樹した。春には桜の花が咲き、夏には『パウエル祭』でにぎわう公園だが、移りゆく時代とともにパウエル通り周辺も年々変化し、治安の悪化が懸念されてきた。過去20年の間には日本レストランや日系商店が次々と姿を消し、2000年には日系一世のサポートを目的に設立された『隣組』がブロードウェーに移転。ここに昔日本人街があったことを知る人も、もはや少ない。  昨年、公園再開発計画により桜の木が伐採の危機にさらされたことから『遺産桜を守る連合会「Save the Sakura Legacy」』が発足。メンバーらの積極的な署名運動をきっかけに、同公園の桜が持つ歴史的、文化的価値観に新たな認識を持つ市民も増えてきたようだ。これらの遺産桜は、伐採という当初の計画をまぬがれたものの、昨年11月にはバンクーバー市の計画変更により、移植予定だった2本の『関山(カンザン)』が突然伐採された。そんなことからコミュニティーの注目は残る『アケボノ』に集中し、今回の移植には敏感にならざるを得ない、というのが事実といえよう。 (取材 ルイーズ阿久沢)

http://www.v-shinpo.com/stay/1top.html より抜粋

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.